Wind Leaders Addressing Future Data Needs – Atmosphere to Electrons Initiative

by Earl Duque | April 9, 2015 4:44 am

[1]I had the honor and pleasure to participate in the Atmosphere to Electrons Workshop hosted by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.  The focus of the initiative is on the use of computational simulation to improve understanding and performance predictions from the microscale to the mesoscale.

 

Penn_Schmitz_windturbine_F300x159[2]

FieldView image published in paper: “Turbulence Transport Phenomena in the Wakes of Wind Turbines”, Earl Duque, Intelligent Light; Pankaj Jha and Jessica Bashioum and Sven Schmitz, The Pennsylvania State University

The event brought together leaders from the wind energy community including National Labs, Universities and Industry. The purpose was to map out the direction for simulating the performance of a wind turbine farm; capturing the temporal and spatial scales from meso-scale (kilometer and hours) down to the airfoil boundary layer scales (micron and milliseconds). Morning and afternoon sessions began with a topical plenary talk followed by working groups focused on the computation and modeling needs at different scales such as Park Scale, Turbine Scale and Airfoil Scale.

Wind Farm - FieldView image as published in "Wind Farm Simulations Using a Full Rotor Model for Wind Turbines", J. Sitaraman, D. Mavriplis, E. Duque AIAA Paper 2014-1086[3]

Wind Farm – FieldView image as published in “Wind Farm Simulations Using a Full Rotor Model for Wind Turbines”, J. Sitaraman, D. Mavriplis, E. Duque
AIAA Paper 2014-1086

 

For me, it was clear that it will be essential to include in-situ data analysis methods and file I/O standards in order to work with the tremendous volumes of data that will be created and processed. This was recognized by many at the meeting.  The use of in-situ methods with FieldView and VisIt offers solutions to those grappling with the current data analysis bottlenecks.

 

FieldView image published in paper: "Turbulence Transport Phenomena in the Wakes of Wind Turbines", Earl Duque, Intelligent Light; Pankaj Jha and Jessica Bashioum and Sven Schmitz, The Pennsylvania State University[4]

With the high-caliber people from government, academia, and industry converging on this challenging problem, the A2E initiative[5] is making progress toward vast improvements in the understanding of the complex physics of wind flowing into and through wind farms.  DOE sees the potential to improve wind farm efficiency by 20% while drastically reducing operating costs for wind energy producers.

Related Research Papers:


Endnotes:
  1. [Image]: http://energy.gov/eere/wind/atmosphere-electrons
  2. [Image]: http://blog.ilight.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Penn_Schmitz_windturbine_F300x159.png
  3. [Image]: http://blog.ilight.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/multi6_vort_column8.png
  4. [Image]: http://blog.ilight.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/5_Turbine_Farm.png
  5. A2E initiative: http://energy.gov/eere/wind/atmosphere-electrons
  6. Turbulence Transport Phenomena in the Wakes of Wind Turbines (AHS Paper): https://vtol.org/store/product/turbulence-transport-phenomena-in-the-wakes-of-wind-turbines-9687.cfm

Source URL: http://blog.ilight.com/a2e2015/


Newsletter: The Future of Wind Energy CFD – DOE’s A2E Initiative

by Roger Rintala | April 9, 2015 2:12 am

[1]

 

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Endnotes:
  1. [Image]: http://blog.ilight.com/category/news/newsletters/
  2. [Image]: http://blog.ilight.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/5_Turbine_Farm.png
  3. View the archive: http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs157/1102629376198/archive/1120574643095.html
  4. [Image]: http://visitor.r20.constantcontact.com/d.jsp?llr=ggek67cab&p=oi&m=1102629376198&sit=awjszijeb&f=fa5f1990-f21e-4fbd-ad20-e8e3255ca1bd

Source URL: http://blog.ilight.com/newsletter-the-future-of-wind-energy-cfd-does-a2e-initiative/


Newsletter: DOE Case Study Highlights IL, FV Parallel Export from ANSYS® Fluent® 16.0

by Roger Rintala | February 20, 2015 4:57 pm

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Endnotes:
  1. [Image]: http://blog.ilight.com/category/news/newsletters/
  2. [Image]: http://blog.ilight.com/visualizingsuccess/?utm_source=DOE+Case+Study%2C+Fluent16+HPC+export&utm_campaign=Newsletter+2%2F15&utm_medium=email
  3. View the archive: http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs157/1102629376198/archive/1119837416821.html
  4. [Image]: http://visitor.r20.constantcontact.com/d.jsp?llr=ggek67cab&p=oi&m=1102629376198&sit=awjszijeb&f=fa5f1990-f21e-4fbd-ad20-e8e3255ca1bd

Source URL: http://blog.ilight.com/newsletter-doe-case-study-highlights-il-fv-parallel-export-from-ansys-fluent-16-0/


ANSYS® Fluent® 16.0 Enables FieldView HPC Capabilities

by Yves-Marie Lefebvre | February 18, 2015 11:55 am

FieldView Parallel Export from ANSYS® Fluent® 16.0

 

ANSYS Fluent 16.0[1] provides the capability to export results to FV-UNS while maintaining the partitioning established for a FLUENT parallel solution.  The file is fully compatible with FieldView Parallel[2] allowing for the substantial time savings from parallel processing.  Every FieldView license will support at least 8 processor cores.  FieldView Parallel will readily scale to 64 processors and beyond.  The export files can be automatically generated during the solver run.

 

Surface Export – From the ANSYS Fluent TUI a new option called “fieldview-unstruct-surfaces” creates a surface only FV-UNS export, where the user selects the exported surfaces from a list of boundary conditions and post-processing surfaces (iso-surfaces, planes…).

FieldView and FLUENT – Power for Unsteady Simulations

 

Unsteady simulations are often post-processed and reviewed using FieldView XDB files[4] which are a fraction of the size of volume data.  Exporting surface data, reading into FieldView Parallel and then having FieldView post-process and produce XDB files can be entirely automated.  This workflow delivers lightweight XDB files for review in FieldView or by the free XDBview[5] reader. When exporting from ANSYS FLUENT, the resulting file can be read into FieldView in parallel, dramatically reducing the read-in time.

 

Endnotes:
  1. ANSYS Fluent 16.0: http://www.ansys.com/Products/ANSYS+16.0+Release+Highlights
  2. FieldView Parallel: http://www.ilight.com/en/products/fieldview-power-tools/parallel
  3. contact our support team: http://www.ilight.com/en/contact
  4. FieldView XDB files: http://www.ilight.com/en/products/fieldview-power-tools/xdb
  5. XDBview: http://www.ilight.com/en/products/xdbview

Source URL: http://blog.ilight.com/ansys-fluent16_fv_hpc/


Newsletter: FieldView 15 and Introducing XDBview

by Roger Rintala | January 30, 2015 4:44 pm

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Endnotes:
  1. [Image]: http://blog.ilight.com/category/news/newsletters/
  2. [Image]: http://blog.ilight.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/xdbviewT250.png
  3. View the archive: http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs157/1102629376198/archive/1119503733216.html
  4. [Image]: http://visitor.r20.constantcontact.com/d.jsp?llr=ggek67cab&p=oi&m=1102629376198&sit=awjszijeb&f=fa5f1990-f21e-4fbd-ad20-e8e3255ca1bd

Source URL: http://blog.ilight.com/newsletter-fieldview-15-and-introducing-xdbview/